Indian summer: the final episode

20 March – 14 April, 2014 – We continued cycling the following days as the weather was still exceptionally good. Clear blue skies all day long, hardly any clouds and sometimes frosty nights. We didn’t want to miss out on scenery just because our bodies might want to rest for a day. They had to wait until the next rainy day.

From Lake Ohau to Twizel:

DSCF9197

DSCF9167 DSCF9287 DSCF9242 DSCF9315

P1210848 P1210858

We were still following the Alps to Ocean cycle trail heading towards New Zealand’s highest mountain: Mount Cook at 3,755m. Despite cycling on a first poor and bumpy path and later on a loose gravel road with 4x4s passing us at maximum speed we enjoyed the outstanding scenery with Mount Cook right in front of us, an emerald blue lake next to us and tweeting birds around us. We pitched our tent at a sheep farm, where we used the shearers’ basic toilet and kitchen facilities. Unfortunately shearing wouldn’t begin before September and we missed out on an opportunity to see them in action. Instead we became unvoluntary witnesses of the slaughtering of two farm pigs. Farm life at its best. We had a nice chat with the farmer, still blood smeared all over his clothes and his wife who apologized several times for the basic facilities we’ve been provided with. Later she brought us two ice-cold beers for our sundowner at Mount Cook. Life is good!

Clouds are slowly beginning to disappear

Clouds are slowly beginning to disappear

DSCF9350

Mount Cook

Mount Cook

Waiting for the dust to disappear

Waiting for the dust to disappear

Napping!

Napping!

DSCF9510

DSCF9556 DSCF9376 DSCF9391 DSCF9428 DSCF9419

DSCF9516

Waiting for the sunset

Waiting for the sunset

Johan still able to balance an empty beer bottle after having killed two

Johan still able to balance an empty beer bottle after having killed two

DSCF9579

Morning legs

Long morning legs

P1210916

Cooking breakfast in the shearers' kitchen

Cooking breakfast in the shearers’ kitchen

DSCF9662 DSCF9665

More sunny days followed and we continued cycling and admiring the surroundings. At Lake Tekapo, recognized as having the most spectacular night sky in New Zealand, we spent a night at one of the worst campsites on the island. As it also functions as a backpacker’s hostel we had to share it with a lot of very young, annoying and noisy backpackers, most of them Americans. That night we actually wanted to get up to watch the starry sky. Knowing we wouldn’t manage by just setting an alarm we drunk a lot before bedtime as we thought we then won’t have a choice. And guess what happened? Despite a lot of tea and despite the noise around us we still didn’t manage to get out of our cosy sleeping bags. It was another freezing cold night and the lack of rest days made us really want to stay inside the tent.

DSCF9742 DSCF9705 DSCF9723 DSCF9701

At Lake Tekapo

At Lake Tekapo

Most photographed church at Lake Tekapo

Most photographed church in New Zealand at Lake Tekapo

We were now on our way north again, first heading to Christchurch and then back to Picton, where we would begin our journey homewards. This also meant busier and flatter roads and less dramatic scenery. It also meant that we more and more often started to discuss what we would do once back home. Amazing how on one hand time passes so quickly and on the other hand it feels so long with all our experiences and memories from our adventures.

But our main concern was still getting home in one piece instead of sharing the destiny of the many possums that end flat as pancakes on the roads. Traffic became ridiculously dangerous with reckless drivers, trucks and cars passing without giving us enough space. We jumped off the roads more than once. Each evening we were glad we made it to the next destination. Worst were the bridges: the roads get even narrower than they already are, a sometimes small shoulder disappears completely and cars are allowed to continue driving at a maximum speed of 100km/h. We were thinking of the wonderful one-lane-bridges at the west coast where all drivers waited patiently either on the other side of the bridge or drove carefully behind us, even though they could have easily passed us. On two-lane-bridges you really need to be lucky if a car or truck stays behind you. We usually only started crossing bridges, when there was no traffic behind us. We pedaled as if the devil was behind us, but often still were too slow to completely cross without passing traffic. At one point, Johan was cycling right in front of me, I checked my mirror and saw a huge truck approaching quickly at a for us horrendous speed. With opposite traffic our only chance to survive this was to jump off the bikes. I yelled at Johan to warn him that the truck was getting closer without braking and within seconds we both were off the bikes and hung against the railing to make ourselves as small as possible. The truck passed and left about 10cm between us, all opposite traffic came to a halt and we knew once more that someone is watching closely over us.

In Christchurch we relaxed a few days with our cycling friends Annika and Roberto, who just settled there to work for a year before they will continue their cycling adventure. We had a lot of fun and even experienced a magnitude 4.3 earthquake. Scary for us but nothing compared to the devastating earthquakes two years earlier. The city still looks like one big construction site with a lot of old building in scaffoldings. However, we very much liked the spirit and creativity at the container city with colourful containers functioning as shops and cafes.

Egg hunt at Christchurch

Egg hunt at Christchurch

At the container city

At the container city

'Green' cash

‘Green’ cash

With Roberto and Annika

With Roberto and Annika

The last days we continued along the beautiful eastern coastline, rested in a picturesque valley at the Pedaller’s rest, cycled in the worst weather ever over twelve super difficult hills, took the ferry from Picton to Wellington, where I got seasick, took the train back to Auckland and finally said our last goodbyes to a wonderful country and wonderful people.

Another nice campsite at the seaside

Another nice campsite at the seaside

On one of the last almost traffic free roads

On one of the last almost traffic free roads

DSCF9967

A glacial river turned into a creek at the beginning of fall

A glacial river turned into a creek

DSCF9985

Discovering Kaikoura

Discovering Kaikoura

DSCF0063DSCF0070DSCF0200

Even though not looking like cabbage it is called cabbage tree, as famous Mr. Cook and crew used the leaves

Even though not looking like it this tree is called cabbage tree, as famous Mr. Cook and crew cooked the leaves and ate them

DSCF0357

Fur seals, hundreds and hundreds of them taking a nap

Fur seals, hundreds and hundreds of them taking a nap or fighting for the best spot

Lobster caravan, unfortunately too expensive for us

Lobster caravan, unfortunately too expensive for us

Beautiful little rest house

Beautiful little rest house between Kaikoura and Blenheim

And this is our small space

And this is our small space at the rest house

With Don who hosted us after cycling 8 hours in the pouring rain

With Don who hosted us after cycling 8 hours in the pouring rain

Johan fixing the bikes on the ferry

Johan fixing the bikes on the ferry

Enjoying the hospitality of the Mete family in Auckland, there are still two family members missing!

Enjoying the hospitality of the Mete family in Auckland, there are still two family members missing!

Last day riding in Auckland

Last day riding in Auckland

Packing the bikes for a loooong journey home

Packing the bikes for a loooong journey home

Distances cycled:

20 March, Lake Ohau Lodge – Twizel, 38km
21 March, Twizel – Braemar Station, 46km
22 March, Braemar Station – Lake Tekapo, 31km
23 March, Lake Tekapo – Fairlie, 47km
24 March, Fairlie – Timaru, 59km
25 March, rest day
26 March, Timaru – Ashburton, 98km
27 March, Ashburton – Christchurch, 107km
28 – 31 March, Christchurch, 35km
1 April, Christchurch – Amberly Beach, 67km
2 April, Amberly Beach – Waiau, 79km
3 April, Wairau – Kaikoura, 89km
4 April Kairkoura, rest day
5 April, Kairoura – Ward, 77km
6 April, Ward, rest day
7 April, Ward – Blenheim, 61km
8 April, Blenheim, rest day
9 April, Blenheim – Picton, 64km
10 April, Picton – Wellington, 37km
11 April, Wellington – Auckland by train
12 – 14 April, Auckland, 100km

Total distances cycled: 24,215km of which 4045km in New Zealand

 

 

 

Das tapfere Schneiderlein

8. – 19. März, 2014 - Nach Invercargill radelten wir endlich mit lang ersehntem Rückenwind. Den ganzen Tag flogen wir fast durch die hügelige Landschaft, deren Straßen von Berg zu Berg steiler wurden. Mittlerweile waren wir in den Catlins, einer rauhen, dünn besiedelten Gegend mit tollen Küsten und dichtem Regenwald. Hier gibt es viele seltene Vogelarten, unter anderem gelbäugige Pinguine.DSCF8196 DSCF8200   DSCF8313

Don't think the architect won a price for this church!

Für diese Kirche hat der Architekt sicher keinen Preis gewonnen!

DSCF8184

Our home for tonight is ready!

Unser heutiges Zuhause ist fertig aufgebaut!

Da ich noch nie wilde Pinguine gesehen habe, war das für mich eine besondere Attraktion. Wie der Zufall es will, war unser Campingplatz dicht an einem Küstenstrich, wo die Pinguine abends an Land kommen. Am Campingplatz riet man uns, so gegen 19.30 Uhr in Richtung Strand zu gehen. Erwartungsfroh liefen wir also entlang der Küste und sahen schon von weitem eine bunte Menschenmenge. Wir waren mal wieder nicht die einzigen. Als wir dann endlich ankamen, standen ungefähr 100 Schaulustige wartend, aufgeregt und mit gezückten Kameras herum. Und ach herrje, da war ein Pinguin. Ja, ganz richtig, genau ein Pinguin stand dicht bei der Menschenmenge. Erst dachte ich, es handele sich um ein ausgestopftes Exemplar, da sich das Ding auf dem Felsen nicht bewegte, aber als wir uns ein Guckloch durch die Menschenmenge erhaschten, sahen wir, dass dieses Exemplar tatsächlich lebte. Ich hatte eigentlich gehofft, eine ganze Kolonie von Pinguinen anzutreffen, nicht nur einen. Daher liefen wir ein bisschen weiter und tatsächlich, ganz weit weg hüpften noch zwei Exemplare aus dem Meer und wackelten gemütlich hintereinander her. Sie wirkten wie ein altes Ehepaar, der Mann vorneweg, sich ab und zu umdrehend und schimpfend und nach ein Paar Streitigkeiten ging es dann weiter. Nach ungefähr einer halben Stunde liefen wir ein bisschen enttäutscht wieder zum Zelt zurück. Drei Pinguine waren nicht gerade überwältigend, aber immerhin. Am nächsten Morgen sahen wir dann noch zwei Hector Delphine, die neugierig in der Bucht schwammen. Damit sind zwei weitere vom Aussterben bedrohte Tierarten gesichtet und abgehakt.

On the way to see the penguins

Auf dem Weg zu den Pinguinen

Who can spot the penguin?

Wer sieht den Pinguin?

Ha, there he is!

Ha, hier ist er!

Von hier ging es wieder langsam in Richtung Norden und Dunedin, auch bekannt als die Öko-Hauptstadt Neuseelands, da die Otago Halbinsel im Osten weitere Pinguinkolonien beherbergt und die einzige Festland-Brutstätte für den königlichen Albatross ist. Die Stadt selber hat mich sehr an Edinburgh erinnert, mit schöner viktorianischer Architektur, einzigartig in der südlichen Hemisphäre.
DSCF8287 DSCF8296

P1210657

Johan with too much energy

Heute mal wieder zu viel Energie

DSCF8366

Albert Hein is everywhere, even in New Zealand!

Albert Hein (Supermarktkette in den Niederlanden) ist überall, sogar in Neuseeland!

One of the many deer farms - most of the meat is being exported to Europe

Rehfarm, eine der vielen in Neuseeland. Das Fleisch wird hauptsächlich nach Europa exportiert.

Dunedin

Dunedin

Nach Dunedin machten wir uns wieder auf ins Innere der Insel, um einen Teil des Otago Eisenbahn-Radwegs abzuradeln. Doch erst mussten wir mehr als 20 oft lange und fast immer steile Berge bis nach Middlemarch überwinden. Ein harter Tag, an dem wir viel zu spät losgefahren sind und erst kurz vor Einbruch der Dunkelheit ankamen. Dieser Tag war fast wie Radeln durch die Highlands von Schottland, kein Wunder dass sich die Schotten vor vielen Jahren Dunedin als ihre neue Heimat fern der Heimat ausgesucht haben.

Von Dunedin bis Middlemarch:

Leaving Dunedin

Abfahrt aus Dunedin

P1210696

DSCF8552 DSCF8556 DSCF8604 DSCF8579

The lion heads

Löwenköpfe

DSCF8588 DSCF8535
Der Otago Eisenbahn-Radweg von Middlemarch nach Ranfurly:

P1210705 DSCF8646 DSCF8627 P1210711 DSCF8633 DSCF8623 DSCF8613

Ach ja, so allmählich lässt uns unsere Kleidung im Stich und das, wo wir doch bald wieder nach Hause fuhren. Begonnen hat es mit meinem Nachthemd. Noch vor ein Paar Tagen war ich stolz, dass es so lange gehalten hat, immerhin habe ich es vom ersten Tag an so gut wie jeden Tag getragen und innig geliebt. Und wie es dann so kam, wollte ich es eines Abends nach dem Duschen über den Kopf ziehen und Ratsch, habe ich einen 30cm langen Riss im Hemd. Natürlich vorne und natürlich hatte ich keine sauberen Kleider dabei. Zum Glück war es draußen schon dunkel und ich schlich mich unauffällig zurück zum Zelt. Da ich so kurz vor Ende unserer Reise nichts neues kaufen wollte und auch keine alten T-Shirts mehr hatte, hieß es nähen ab sofort. Und das sollte eine fast tägliche Beschäftigung werden, da die Baumwolle mittlerweile so dünn war, dass ich bei jeder noch so kleinen Bewegung nachts ein weiteres Loch ins Hemd riss. Man hätte fast meinen können, dass Johan mir wie wild geworden die Kleider vom Leibe riss…

In Ranfurly haben wir bei einer Warm Showers Familie im Garten gezeltet und einen typisch neuseeländischen Abend inklusive Abendessen verbracht. Da das Wetter am nächsten Tag so schlecht war, luden uns die Kirks ein, noch einen weiteren Tag zu bleiben und wir wurden in die Geheimnisse des schottischen Sports Curling eingeweiht. Hat super Spaß gemacht, vor allem das Eisfegen!

P1210728 P1210733

With the Kirks

Mit den Kirks

Weiter ging es dann durch eine sehr abgelegene Gegend und über einen langen Pass. Den ganzen Tag über fuhren nur eine Handvoll Autos an uns vorbei und mit dem wieder mal super schönen Wetter hatten wie einen weiteren wunderschönen und außergewöhnlichen Tag in Neuseeland.

DSCF8754 DSCF8680 DSCF8709 DSCF8733

P1210744

DSCF8680

DSCF8771 DSCF8760 P1210741 DSCF8770 P1210743 DSCF8822

DSCF8794
Von Duntroon aus, wo wir wieder relativ spät ankamen, da wir den Schwierigkeitsgrad des Passes, der aus zwei Gipfeln bestand unterschätzt hatten, ging es dann am nächsten Tag auf dem ‘Alps to Ocean’-Radweg weiter in Richtung Südalpen. Der Radweg war ein Traum! Wieder mal. Wir dachten hier sogar einmal, dass wir uns jetzt wohl irgendwo im Nirgendwo nun doch verfahren hätten, da der Weg kaum noch einem Weg ähnelte, sondern aus einem Meter hohem Gras bestand. Erst als uns einige Mountainbiker entgegenkamen, waren wir erleichtert. Auch hier mussten wir über einen Berg, der in der Radwegbeschreibung als 9km lang beschrieben war. Nach besagten 9km waren wir irgendwo an einem Hang, aber ganz sicher nicht oben, ein Ende des Berges war nicht in Sicht. Mittlerweile wurde der Grasweg auch zu einem felsigen und schmalen Pfad: links der Berg und rechts ging es steil nach unten. Wir waren jetzt auf einem Mountainbike-Trail, der äußerst ungeeignet für Trekkingräder mit viel Gepäck ist. Irgendwann sind wir von den Rädern abgestiegen, nicht weil der Weg zu steil wurde, sondern eher, weil er so steinig war, dass uns das Gehubbel zu blöde wurde. Trotz unserer leicht säuerlichen Laune genossen wir die einmaligen Ausblicke ins Tal, auf den See und die schneebedeckten Berge. Gegen 18 Uhr erreichten wir dann endlich den Gipfel, von nun an ging es 16km nach unten, wofür wir auch eine Stunde brauchten, da der Weg auch nach unten nicht besser wurde. Unten angekommen stellten wir bei der Lodge unser Zelt auf und gönnten uns ein leckeres Drei-Gänge-Menü im Restaurant mit Blick auf See und Alpen. Ein weiterer unglaublicher Tag neigte sich einem wunderbaren Ende zu.

DSCF8936

DSCF8917 DSCF8901

P1210777 P1210790

DSCF8930

DSCF9012

Lunch break

Mittagspause

DSCF8982

DSCF9060 DSCF9003

P1210809

DSCF9045

DSCF9034

DSCF9069

DSCF9072

DSCF9083

DSCF9090

DSCF9095

DSCF9124

P1210822

Geradelte Kilometer:

8. März, Invercargill – Curio Bay, 76km
9. März,, Curio Bay – Owaka, 69km
10. März, Owaka – Balclutha, 48km
11. März, Balaclutha -Dunedin, 85km
12./13. März, Dunedin, 30km
14. März, Dunedin – Middlemarch, 85km
15. März, Middlemarch – Ranfurly, 62km
16. März, Ranfurly, rest day
17. März, Ranfurly – Duntroon, 80km
18. März, Duntroon – Otematata, 68km
19. März, Otematata – Lake Ohau Lodge, 67km

Gesamtdistanz: 23.182 km, davon 3.012km in Neuseeland

The valiant little tailor

8 – 19 March, 2014 – We left Invercargill with a strong tailwind supporting us all day long. What a ride! We almost flew over the rolling hills, that became steeper and steeper the further southeast we rode. We were now in the Catlins, a rugged, sparsely populated area featuring a scenic coastal landscape and dense temperate rainforest both of which harbour many endangered species of birds, most notably the rare yellow-eyed penguin. DSCF8196 DSCF8200   DSCF8313

Don't think the architect won a price for this church!

Don’t think the architect won a price for this church!

DSCF8184

Our home for tonight is ready!

Our home for tonight is ready once more!

As I had never seen wild penguins I was very keen on spotting them while being in this area. Luckily our campsite was close by a coastline where some colonies are supposed to come ashore at dusk. The campsite manager advised us to go there by 7.30pm. Excitedly we (OK, I) walked along the coast and from far away we could already see a lot of people standing on the rocks. We weren’t the only ones, it seemed. As we got closer to the area there were about 100 people with cameras ready to shoot waiting for penguins to arrive. And yes, there was a penguin. Exactly one. Standing still on a rock a few meters away from an overwhelmed crowd. First I thought it was a joke and this penguin wasn’t real as it didn’t move at all, but getting closer and finding a hole to look through the crowd I could tell it was real. When I think about a colony of penguins I think more about hundreds of penguins, not just one. So we decided to continue walking a bit further to wait for more penguins to arrive, maybe they had a fun day out at the sea and were late home. And yes, far far away we spotted two more penguins slowly jumping out of the water and walking clumsily behind each other. They looked like an old married couple, fighting every once in a while with the man walking in front, turning back every once in a while to tell his wife to hurry up. Well, after about another 30 minute-wait and more and more people arriving at the beach but no further penguin appearances we left the scene. Not really satisfied with the quantities, but well, at least we saw a few. The next morning we also saw two hector dolphins, another endangered species, that regularly swim in the bay. Two more animals checked!

On the way to see the penguins

On the way to see the penguins

Who can spot the penguin?

Who can spot the penguin?

Ha, there he is!

Ha, there he is!

We were now slowly cycling north again, heading to Dunedin, often referred to as the eco-capital of New Zealand as the Otago Peninsula to the east is home to another colony of penguins (they don’t mention the number of penguins in this colony, hopefully more than 5) and also boasts the only mainland breeding colony of the Royal Albatross. The town itself has the finest examples of Victorian and Edwardian architecture in the Southern Hemisphere and reminded me a lot of Edinburgh. DSCF8287 DSCF8296

P1210657

Johan with too much energy

Johan with too much energy

DSCF8366

Albert Hein is everywhere, even in New Zealand!

Albert Hein is everywhere, even in New Zealand!

One of the many deer farms - most of the meat is being exported to Europe

One of the many deer farms – most of the meat is being exported to Europe

Dunedin

Dunedin

From there we headed inland again to cycle parts of the Otago Central Rail Trail, another beautiful path that follows the former Otago railway line. But before we got there we had to cycle to Middlemarch and overcome more than 20 often long and always steep hills. A tough journey we started far too late and ended just before it got dark again. That day we were even more reminded of Scotland. No surprise the early Scots chose Dunedin to settle and build their home away from home.

From Dunedin to Middlemarch:

Leaving Dunedin

Leaving Dunedin

P1210696

DSCF8552 DSCF8556 DSCF8604 DSCF8579

The lion heads

The lion heads

DSCF8588 DSCF8535
The Otago Rail Trail from Middlemarch to Ranfurly:

P1210705 DSCF8646 DSCF8627 P1210711 DSCF8633 DSCF8623 DSCF8613

By the way, slowly our gear is falling apart, just a few weeks before we are flying home again. It started with my nightie I’ve been wearing since day one of our trip and almost every single night since. I love it and just a few days ago I looked at it thinking that I am very proud on it as it doesn’t have a single hole nor tears anywhere. I maybe should not have thought so, as a few days later I was putting it on after a shower on a campsite when I tore a huge hole of about 30cm into it – at the front and of course while not having anything else with me than my dirty clothes. Thankfully it was already dark outside and I sneakily went back to our tent. As I didn’t want to buy anything new and had no old T-shirts to replace it I started stitching up the tear which became an almost daily task from then on as new tears appeared every morning. One might assume Johan had torn it off my body, but I can assure you, it’s just the thin cotton that’s too weak to resist my nightly movements.

In Ranfurly we pitched our tent in the garden of another Warm Showers family and enjoyed a typical New Zealand family dinner. As the weather forecast was really bad for the next day the Kirks invited us to stay another day and we got introduced to their favorite sports: the ancient Scottish game of curling, great fun!

P1210728 P1210733

With the Kirks

With the Kirks

We now continued through another remote area over a long and winding pass road to Duntroon. Only a handful of cars passed us all day long and with the once more beautiful weather we added another beautiful and extraordinary day in New Zealand.

 

DSCF8754 DSCF8680 DSCF8709 DSCF8733

P1210744

DSCF8680

DSCF8771 DSCF8760 P1210741 DSCF8770 P1210743 DSCF8822

DSCF8794
From Duntroon, where we again arrived pretty late as we underestimated the difficulty of the pass with a double-peak, we were heading into the direction of the Southern Alps again, this time from the other side. We rode the full length of the Alps to Ocean cycle trail, another awesome cycle route. There is one section where we really thought we finally got lost, despite the many road signs. We had to cycle on a path that wasn’t a real path anymore, but mostly high grass and only when some other cyclists passed a little later, we were confident we got it right. We had to cross a pass again described as a 9km uphill ride. When we passed the 9km-mark we were surprised that the peak wasn’t anywhere but near, we continued and continued to climb. The small path became a narrow stony track more suitable for mountain bikers than touring cyclists. At one point we stepped off our bikes and continued pushing them uphill, not because of the gradients, more because of the bumpy, difficult surface of the path. Despite our slightly deteriorating mood we enjoyed the gorgeous views down the valley and at around 6pm we reached the highest point at 900m. Finally, now we would go downhill for the remaining 16km – and get freezing cold. As the path didn’t really improve it took us another hour to get to the lodge where we camped and treated ourselves to a luxury 3-course dinner at the restaurant overlooking the lake and the alps. Another fantastic day had come to an even better end.

DSCF8936

DSCF8917 DSCF8901

P1210777 P1210790

DSCF8930

DSCF9012

Lunch break

Lunch break

DSCF8982

DSCF9060 DSCF9003

P1210809

DSCF9045

DSCF9034

DSCF9069

DSCF9072

DSCF9083

DSCF9090

DSCF9095

DSCF9124

P1210822

Distances cycled:

8 March, Invercargill – Curio Bay, 76km
9 March, Curio Bay – Owaka, 69km
10 March, Owaka – Balclutha, 48km
11 March, Balaclutha -Dunedin, 85km
12/13 March, Dunedin, 30km
14 March, Dunedin – Middlemarch, 85km
15 March, Middlemarch – Ranfurly, 62km
16 March, Ranfurly, rest day
17 March, Ranfurly – Duntroon, 80km
18 March, Duntroon – Otematata, 68km
19 March, Otematata – Lake Ohau Lodge, 67km

Total distance cycled: 23,182 km of which 3,012km in New Zealand

Einfach nur genial!

23. Februar – 7. März 2014 – Nach einem langen und anstrengenden Radtag freuten wir uns darauf, am nächsten Morgen mal wieder auszuschlafen. Die Wettervorhersage war schlecht und wir glaubten an einen bevorstehenden Ruhetag. Pustekuchen! Um 8 Uhr schien die Sonne auf unser Zelt und Lena saß bereits beim Frühstück, da sie natürlich weiterfahren wollte. Da mussten wir natürlich mithalten, blauer Himmel, Sonnenschein, diese Blöße konnten wir uns nicht geben. Vor allem, weil es hier in Haast auch nichts zu tun oder besichtigen gab.

Das Radeln fiel uns heute schwer. Hügelige Landschaft mit schneebedeckten Bergen im Hintergrund, aber selbst bei den kleinsten Steigungen brannten unsere Oberschenkel wie Feuer. Nach ca. 50km und kurz vor einer richtigen Steigung entdeckten wir einen kleinen Campingplatz. Wir blieben, obwohl Lena tapfer weiterfuhr.

 

P1210457

DSCF6830 DSCF6820

Our view from the campsite

Unsere Aussicht vom Campingplatz aus

DSCF6849

With Lena

Mit Lena

A tent with a view

Ein Zelt mit Aussicht

A tourist bus spoiling our view ;-0

Eine Busladung, die unsere Aussicht stört :-)

Und am nächsten Tag waren wir froh über unsere Entscheidung: nach ca. 4km sollten wir den für uns bisher steilsten Berg hochradeln und zwar ganze drei Kilometer lang. Wir schafften die Steigungen gerade noch so, ohne abzusteigen, aber mussten oft anhalten. Wie immer wurden wir belohnt: dieses mal nicht nur mit tollen Ausblicken und einzigartigen Landschaften, sondern auch mit einem Restaurant auf der anderen Seite des Passes mit leckerem Mittagsbuffet und Portionen, die uns immer hungrigen Radlern sehr entgegenkamen.

Early morning clouds

Morgenstimmung

P1210481

After the pass

Auf der anderen Seite des Passes

Portions pleasing hungry cyclists. Believe it or not but Johan ordered a second, this time small plate!!!

Das sind doch mal fahrradfreundliche Portionen. Und selbst hier hat sich Johan noch einen zweiten, dieses Mal aber kleinen Teller nachbestellt!

Der Nachmittag war absolut großartig, atemberaubend, einfach traumhaft, eigentlich fehlen mir hier die Worte. Ein starker Rückenwind blies uns über die Hügel bis nach Wanaka. Wir fuhren an zwei smaragdblauen Seen entlang, trafen später Lena wieder und freuten uns über einen so genialen Tag.

DSCF7106

P1210508

DSCF7144 DSCF7107

With Lena again...

Schon wieder Lena…

In Wanaka haben wir uns einen Tag ausgeruht, da wir am nächsten Tag wieder eine Pass überqueren mussten. Dieses Mal ging es über die höchste Passstraße Neuseelands auf 1078m hoch nach Queenstown, der Party-Hauptstadt. Ich weiß, dass ich mich wiederhole, aber auch dieses Mal waren die Landschaften einfach unglaublich und jeden einzelnen Schweißtropfen wert, den wir auf dieser Strecke verloren haben. Mittlerweile sind wir wirklich fit und kaum ein Berg kann uns mehr abschrecken. Zum Glück, denn vor uns liegen noch sehr viele solcher Herausforderungen.

Kiwi fence art

Kiwi Zaunkunst

How about this one?

Soll ich den hier nehmen?

A beautiful old hotel on the way up

Ein altes Hotel auf dem Weg nach oben

The further up we got the narrower became the valley

Je höher wir kamen, desto enger wurde das Tal

DSCF7211

We made it!

Geschafft!

Resting at the top before going downhill!

Kurzes Nickerchen, bevor es wieder nach unten geht!

Da wir ja eher die Langweiler sind und ja auch schon mittelalt, haben wir in Queenstown nicht gefeiert sondern geruht. Die nächste Herausforderung lag bereits vor uns: eine Radtour durch eine ’Herr der Ringe’ Landschaft. Um dorthin zu gelangen, mussten wir ein altes Dampfboot über den See nehmen. Das Boot fuhr mehrmals täglich, aber wir wollten das erste Boot um 10 Uhr nehmen. Um 6.30 Uhr sind wir also aufgestanden, haben geduscht und um 6.45 Uhr lagen wir wieder in unseren noch warmen Schlafsäcken. Wir waren noch so müde, der Himmel grau und wolkenverhangen und es war saukalt. Also nahmen wir uns das nächste Boot um 12 Uhr vor, so wie Lena. Als wir fertig gefrühstückt und das Zelt gepackt hatten fing es an zu regnen, und zwar in Strömen. Da wir nun schon fertig waren hofften wir, dass es sich nur um Schauer handelte und radelten tapfer zum Hafen, kauften unsere Boottickets und mir ein Paar warme Wollhandschuhe und warteten, dass sich zum einen der Regen lichtete und zum anderen auf das Boot.

Gerade als wir unsere Räder auf’s Boot laden wollten kam der Kapitän auf uns zu, um uns zu warnen: wir müssten zwei Flüsse überqueren, beide ohne Brücken und beide würden im Regen bis auf Hüfthöhe anschwellen. Außerdem gebe es keine Übernachtungsmöglichkeiten und Essen könnten wir auf den nächsten 100km auch nirgends kaufen. Letzteres wußten wir und nach kurzem Hin und Her gemeinsam mit Lena beschlossen wir, weiterzufahren. Schlimmstenfalls müssten wir dann eben vor dem Fluss zelten.

Waiting in the rain and cold

Warten im Regen und in der Kälte

Getting things sorted out on the boat

Nochmal alles kurz für die Überfahrt sortieren

DSCF7344

Testing Lena's bike

Testfahrt auf Lenas Fahrrad

The boat is leaving again…without us

Das Boot verlässt den Hafen, dieses Mal ohne uns.

Als wir die andere Seite des Sees erreichten, hatte sich der Himmel aufgeklärt und die Sonne schien. Wer sagt’s denn? Die Berge um uns herum waren mit Neuschnee bedeckt, ein eiskalter Wind blies uns ins Gesicht und es war auch noch eiskalt. Gut, dass ich mir die Handschuhe gekauft hatte! Warm eingepackt fuhren wir drei gemeinsam los, auf einem schmalen, kurvigen Feldweg, zuerst am See entlang und dann durch ein Flusstal und mal wieder über einen kleinen Pass. An diesem Tag sind wir aus mehreren Gründen nicht weit gekommen: erstens sind wir erst um 13.30 Uhr losgefahren; zweitens Gegenwind und schlechte Straße und drittens mussten wir andauernd anhalten, um Fotos zu machen. Schließlich waren wir in einer Gegend, in der Herr der Ringe gedreht wurde.

DSCF7423 DSCF7438 DSCF7444 DSCF7455 DSCF7460

P1210570 DSCF7469 DSCF7472 DSCF7474 DSCF7483

DSCF7485 DSCF7496 DSCF7499 DSCF7521
P1210583

Lena hatte an diesem Tag schwer zu kämpfen, da ihre kleinen Räder nicht so gut für solche Schotterstraßen geeignet sind und wir warteten auf sie an der ersten Flussüberquerung. Das Wasser war nur knöcheltief, also Schuhe aus und durch – durch eiskaltes Wasser. Kurz danach überquerten wir dann besagten 3km-Pass. Oben blies der Wind noch stärker und da es bereits nach 18 Uhr war, wurde uns klar, dass wir die Strecke bis zum nächsten Campingplatz unmöglich noch vor Einbruch der Dunkelheit erreichen konnten. Wir hielten an einer kleiner Schäferhütte, bauten unser Zelt auf und hatten sogar ein bisschen Schutz vor dem Wind in einer der Hütten. Das war wohl einer unserer schönsten Zeltplätze auf unsere Reise! Wir haben Lena übrigens nicht mehr gesehen und stellten am nächsten Tag fest, dass sie ungefähr 100m vor uns am Fluss anhielt und dort ihr Zelt aufgeschlagen hatte.

P1210581

Resting half way to the top

Kurz ausruhen auf halbem Weg nach oben

DSCF7584

Yeah, another pass tackled!

Juhu, wieder einen Pass geschafft.

DSCF7538 DSCF7583

DSCF7577 DSCF7600 DSCF7634

Our dinner house

Unsere Hütte zum Abendessen

Am nächsten Tag verabschiedeten wir uns dann zum letzten Mal von Lena, da wir von nun an in verschiedene Richtungen radelten und sie unmöglich nochmals einholen konnten.

Preparing breakfast in the morning

Frühstücksvorbereitungen

DSCF7645 P1210599

Preparing breakfast the next morning

The second river crossing - piece of cake

Die zweite Flussüberquerung, für Anfänger!

Bye bye Lena!

Tschüs Lena!


DSCF7667 DSCF7696 DSCF7681

Wir befanden uns nun auf dem Weg nach Te Anau und Milford Sounds, den Fjorden Neuseelands um das zu tun, was ein richtiger Pauschal-Tourist so macht: einen Bus nehmen, Boot fahren, den Bus zurück nehmen und das alles mit ungefähr 30 anderen Touristen verschiedener Nationen an einem regnerischen Tag. Die Fjorde waren schön, trotz des Regens, aber der Tag war nicht so schön wie sonst. Dieser Pauschaltourismus ist nichts für uns, wir halten lieber an, wann wir wollen und nicht, wann ein Busfahrer das für richtig hält.

In the bus, these photos will certainly turn out to be gorgeous :-0

Im Bus, das werden sicher tolle Fotos!

This picture tells it all

Dieses Bild sagt alles.

DSCF7732

Our boat

Unser Boot

DSCF7759

DSCF7826

Johan with his new girlfriend Lucy

Johan mit seiner neuen Freundin Lucy

DSCF7847 DSCF7886

In Invercargill hatten wir wieder eine Warm Showers Übernachtung ‘gebucht’ und damit zwei anstrengende Tage vor uns. Anstrengend, weil wir beide Tage über 100km auf hügeligen Straßen mit Pässen radeln mussten und sehr anstrengend, da wir auch noch gegen den Wind strampelten. Der Gegenwind war insbesondere deswegen so frustrierend, da in unserem Reiseführer stand, dass auf dieser Strecke mit starkem Rückenwind zu rechnen sei! Und ausgerechnet, wenn wir da fahren, bläst er in die andere Richtung. Das passiert wahrscheinlich nur einmal im Jahr….

Nichtsdestotrotz haben wir es bis Invercargill geschafft, wo uns schon ein leckeres warmes Abendessen sowie John, sein Sohn Fergus, Emmy, der Hund und 50 Alpaca-Schafe erwarteten. Andrew, der Schotte, und Jens und Conny aus Deutschland, alle drei auch Radtouristen, zelteten im Garten und wir verbrachten lange und lustige Abende zusammen.

My outfit also needs some adjustment

Auch meine Kopfbedeckung ist noch anpassungsfähig

DSCF8028 S0017902 P1210625 S0017902 DSCF8015 DSCF7999 DSCF7969 DSCF7965 DSCF7921

DSCF8104

A little detour away from the busy highway

Ein kleiner Umweg, um dem Verkehr zu entgehen

At the sea again in the south of the South Island

Endlich wieder am Meer, dieses Mal im Süden der Südinsel

With John and Emmy

Mit John und Emmy

With the Scotsman

Mit dem Schotten

DSCF8162

Geradelte Kilometer:

23. Februar, Haast – Pleasant Flat: 48km
24. Februar, Pleasant Flat – Wanaka: 98km
25. Februar, Wanaka Ruhetag
26. Februar, Wanaka – Queenstown: 79km
27. Februar, Queenstown
28. Februar, Queenstown – Mavora: 35km
1. März, Mavora – Te Anau: 93km
2./3. März, Te Anau
4. März, Te Anau – Tuatapere:103km
5. März, Tuatapere – Invercargill: 107km
6./7. March, Invercargill: 24km
Gesamtdistanz: 22.489km, davon 2.343km in Neuseeland