A vacation on the edge – part 1

Having been back from our 20-month adventure for 2.5 months we thought it was time for another cycling trip. I started working 9 hours a week and the company was closing for vacation the first three weeks of August. Not an ideal time to go away as half of Europe takes off at exactly that time, but we had no choice. And off we went on the 2nd of August.

Day 1 – 80km to Tuttlingen: The plan was to leave early as we had packed most of our gear the evening before. But as always on the first day, we only left by 11am. We wanted to pedal South in the direction of the French Alps by crossing Switzerland and end up somewhere at the Italian Riviera. As always these plans changed. The first rain hit us after 8km. Thankfully we were just shopping our food for the day and by the time we were ready the rain had stopped. We cycled along the river Neckar, mostly on small bike paths through forests and fields and enjoyed the lush scenery. We ended up in Tuttlingen at the famous Danube and pitched our tent at a small campsite where only cyclists and mostly French cyclists would camp. We could tell that the Danube cycle path is very popular amongst pseudo touring cyclists from the amount of cyclists of all ages and shapes we met. That day we just managed to get to bed on time before the skies opened!

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Old town of Rottweil

Old town of Rottweil

Day 2 – 65km to Kreuzlingen (CH): The rain only stopped at 7:30am and we packed up everything as quickly as we could but still only left by 9:45am, a good and healthy breakfast is too important. It’s been a beautiful route, after we had climbed a 3km long and super steep hill. At the top of the hill we could see the Lake of Constance in the mist and beautiful rolling hills all around us. From then on we mostly went downhill through a picturesque valley and every once in a while we could catch a glimpse of the Lake. As the weather improved we dried our tent during lunch, went for a swim as soon as we reached the Lake, ate ice cream in Constance in the rain and pitched our tent in the pouring rain at an extremely busy and expensive campsite in Switzerland. At least there was a dry spot to cook!

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The far too busy campsite

The far too busy campsite

Day 3 – 67km to Kriessern at the Rhine: We woke to beautiful weather and continued cycling all along the Southern shore of Lake Constance. Tons of people do the same, it’s another famous cycle route. We still enjoyed the beauty of this area with the Lake to the left and snow-capped mountains to the front and right. Easy cycling all day long. When checking in at the campsite and asking for the price, we were told it’s 22CHF. That’s cheap (in Swiss terms) we thought, only until we paid the bill and another 8 CHF were added for the tent! We saved the 1CHF for the shower and enjoyed a wash with ice-cold water as it was still very hot outside. Right after dinner it rained again!

Scenic lunch break

Scenic lunch break

Easy Rhine cycling

Easy Rhine cycling

Day 4 – 81km to Weesen: Rain again in the morning, so we left late to avoid the worst. The route continued along the Rhine and by lunchtime the sun was shining again, the sky became clear blue, the grass even greener and the scenery lovelier. We climbed one short but steep hill along Walensee, Johan lost a fight with a deaf moped rider who managed to stay right in front of him for a few kilometres without letting him pass. Johan became almost furious and I smiled behind seeing Johan move from left to right to left to right on the small path. We camped next to the lake at a mosquito campsite and this time the rain only started in the middle of the night (thankfully (!!!) we had our laundry hanging outside. We should have learnt by now.

More Rhine cycling

More Rhine cycling

Beautiful sky

Beautiful sky

 

A picturesque village

A picturesque village

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At the Walensee

At the Walensee

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Switzerland at its best

Switzerland at its best

Day 5 – 88km to Flüelen: Rain all night, sunshine in the morning. As we wanted to climb our first pass, the Klausenpass, we packed up everything wet and left shortly after 8am. For about 34km we cycled on a dedicated bike path through a valley that got narrower with every kilometer. A few sheepish clouds were hanging between the mountains, but otherwise it was a perfect day for a long climb. The air was very clear, all we heard were the cow bells, some motorbikes in the distance and the odd barking from a dog. We moved to the main pass road when the real climbing started. Traffic was acceptable with a few idiots on motorbikes passing too fast and too close. After about two hours or 13km we reached a plateau, a welcomed rest for our legs far beyond 1,000m of altitude. The last 8km to the top continued very steep and I hardly cycled faster than 5km/h. At some scarier parts with a very narrow road I cycled trying to watch the road and the edge at the same time. Only a very low fence separated me and Rudi, the bike, from the edge of a precipice. The weather deteriorated again and by the time we reached the top, we were in the middle of the clouds. Happy to have reached 1,952 m but sad for not having had a view. And now we were looking forward to a wonderful descent only to learn we had to climb two more times. A big deception. By the time we finally reached a village we treated ourselves to the best Döner ever, pitched our tent by the Vierwaldstätter See and went to bed shattered.

The beginning of the valley

The beginning of the valley

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Here is where the real pain began

Here is where the real pain began

 

The plateau

The plateau

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Still way to go...

Still way to go…

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Hooray, we made it!

Hooray, we made it!

Cold downhill

Cold downhill

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The Vierwaldstätter See

The Vierwaldstätter See

Day 6 – 53km to Giswil: Despite it wasn’t raining we took it easy, we still felt the long climb in our legs. We continued cycling along the lake for about 10km and through a few bike tunnels – the only tunnels we like – before we reached a sign warning us about the upcoming busy road without bike path and advising us to take the train. Having seen the traffic it was an easy choice for us, the train it was. We cycled one of the Swiss national bike routes that guided us to a ferry to cross the lake. As we arrived about 10 minutes too late, we had a forced rest at the lake for about 1.5 hours. The weather was perfect, it was lunchtime and for once we really rested. By the time we reached the other side of the lake the weather worsened and soon we would cycle in the rain again. Within no time it was pouring cats and dogs and at the campsite we opted for a cabin instead of pitching the tent. Not the best choice, as the rain stopped shortly afterwards and it stayed dry all night. Arghhhh!

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Waiting for the ferry

Waiting for the ferry

Another picturesque village

Another picturesque village

Day 7 – 82km to Gwatt: Worst night ever, our neighbour must have had a nightmare as she started screaming in the middle of the night. The route was very scenic and we had to climb a lot. It started with a 12% and 2km climb followed by some shorter and easier climbs, followed by the Brünigpass, where we cycled on an extremely busy pass road for about 3km and decided to take a detour to avoid the heavy traffic. We didn’t really get it why this road was part of the national bike route, far too busy and dangerous.

That day we also passed a lot of signs from hotels offering ‘Free accommodation’. We were very tempted to take on their offer, but in the end preferred our tent to sleep in. Switzerland is also a country with very funny names, at least for me as a German: Fußpflege Zwicky, Märchy, Stöckli Metall AG, Garage Wursteisen, Tschudi Holz AG to name just a few. Sometimes we thought that Swiss German is easy to speak, you just need to add ‘li’ to the end of a noun and that’s it. But there is much more to this very nice sounding language.

We also cycled through Interlaken, situated between two lakes with a beautiful Jungfrau vista. Unfortunately the city was packed with tourists from all over the world and far too busy for us so we quickly pedalled through the city, admired the ‘Jungfrau’, whose top unfortunately was covered in clouds. We ended up at the most expensive campsite so far and by the time we went to bed it started raining and storming again and wouldn’t stop all night. Time for a decision on how to move on in this weather!

Another sunny morning

Another sunny morning

Steep hills

Steep hills

Beautiful scenery

Beautiful scenery

Wooden houses with yummy tomatoes

Wooden houses with yummy tomatoes

More picturesque villages

More picturesque villages

Glaciers

Glaciers

Fantastic downhills

Fantastic downhills

Tourists

Tourists

Vomiting cyclists

Vomiting cyclists

Dangerous rail tracks

Dangerous rail tracks

Another lake

Another lake

Another lovely village

Another lovely village

And another overpriced campsite

And another overpriced campsite

 

 

 

 

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Ein Urlaub am Rande des Abgrunds – Teil 1

Nachdem wir bereits zweieinhalb Monate von unserer Weltreise zurück waren, dachten wir, es sei an der Zeit, mal wieder länger radeln zu gehen. Da ich mittlerweile neun Stunden die Woche arbeite und das Unternehmen im August drei Wochen Betriebsferien machte, war August zwar kein idealer Zeitpunkt für uns, da dann halb Europa im Urlaub ist, aber wir hatten ja keine Wahl. Also ging’s am 2. August los.

1. Tag – 80km bis Tuttlingen: Eigentlich wollten wir früh starten, immerhin hatten wir fast alles am Abend zuvor gepackt. Aber wie immer am ersten Tag, kamen wir erst um 11 Uhr los. Unser grober Plan war in Richtung Süden zu radeln, durch die Schweiz und über die französischen Meeralpen nach Südfrankreich und danach an die Riviera nach Italien. Aber wie immer kam alles anders…

An diesem Tag fing es bereits nach 8km an zu regnen. Zum Glück machten wir gerade Essenseinkäufe und als wir wieder aus dem Supermarkt rauskamen, war der schlimmste Regen vorbei. Einen Großteil der Strecke radelten wir am Neckar entlang, meist auf kleinen Radwegen durch Wälder, Felder und Wiesen. Die Landschaft war super schön. An diesem Tag schafften wir es bis Tuttlingen an der Donau und zelteten auf einem kleinen Zeltplatz, der ausschließlich Radfahrern vorbehalten war. An diesem Abend waren hier fast ausschließlich Franzosen, die wohl auf dem weitbekannten Donauradweg tourten. Dieser Radweg scheint sehr beliebt zu sein, zumindest was die Anzahl unfitter Radfahrer jeden Alters angeht. An diesem Abend schafften wir es gerade rechtzeitig ins Bett, bevor der große Regen anfing!

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Old town of Rottweil

Altstadt Rottweil

2. Tag – 65km bis Kreuzlingen (CH): Erst um 7:30h hörte es auf zu regnen und wir packten so schnell wir konnten. Trotzdem kamen wir erst um 9:45h los, ein ausgiebiges Frühstück ist uns zu wichtig! Die Strecke war landschaftlich super schön, vor allem, nachdem wir den ca. 3km langen und sehr steilen Berg erklommen hatten. Von dort oben konnten wir einen ersten Blick auf den Bodensee erhaschen, der von sanften Hügeln umgeben und mit Nebelschwaden überzogen in der Ferne lag. Ab da ging’s dann sehr lange nur bergab durch romantische Täler und immer wieder mit Blick auf den Bodensee. Mittags war es wieder schön und wir trockneten unser Zelt auf einem Spielplatz in der Sonne, schwammen im Bodensee, aßen Eis in Konstanz im Regen und stellten schließlich unser Zelt bei strömendem Regen auf einem sauteuren und total überfüllten Campingplatz in der Schweiz auf. Wenigstens gab es dort überdachte Kochstellen.

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The far too busy campsite

Auf dem überfüllten Campingplatz

3. Tag – 67km nach Kriessern am Rhein: Herrliches Sonnenwetter am nächsten Morgen und Radeln entlang des Südufers vom Bodensee. Millionen andere Radler hatten dieselbe Idee. Trotzdem genossen wir das schöne Wetter, die tolle Landschaft mit dem See zur Linken und schneebedeckten Berggipfeln zu unserer Rechten. Das Radeln war den ganzen Tag ein Spaziergang. Als wir abends auf einem Campingplatz eincheckten und nach dem Preis fragten, wurde dieser uns mit 22CHF benannt. Das ist aber billig, dachten wir so bei uns, bis es dann ans Bezahlen ging. Das Zelt kostete nämlich nochmals 8 CHF extra. Verärgert sparten wir uns den zusätzlichen Franken für eine warme Dusche und duschten eiskalt, es war sowieso noch sehr warm. Nach dem Abendessen regnete es dann wieder!

Scenic lunch break

Idyllische Mittagspause

Easy Rhine cycling

Leichte Spazierfahrt entlang des Rheins

4. Tag – 81km nach Weesen: Starker Regen am Morgen, also warteten wir, bis das Schlimmste vorbei war. Es ging zunächst wieder am Rhein entlang und gegen Mittag schien die Sonne wieder, der Himmel riss auf, das Gras sah jetzt noch grüner aus und die Landschaft mit den bizarren Wolken noch schöner. Am Walensee mussten wir einen kurzen aber sehr steilen Berg erklimmen, Johan stritt sich mit einem Mopedfahrer, der auf einem kleinen Weg partout nicht auf die Seite fahren wollte. Amüsiert verfolgte ich das Treiben vor mir mit Johan, der klingelte und schrie und immer wütender wurde und einem anscheinend tauben Mopedfahrer. Wir zelteten am anderen Ende des Sees auf einem kleinen Waldcampingplatz, wo es vor Moskitos nur so wimmelte. Heute fing der Regen erst gegen Mitternacht an. Gut, dass unsere Wäsche noch draußen hing. Wir hätten es mittlerweile eigentlich besser wissen müssen!

More Rhine cycling

Noch mehr Rheinradeln

Beautiful sky

Tolle Wolkenformationen

A picturesque village

Ein schönes Schweizer Dorf

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At the Walensee

Am Walensee

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Switzerland at its best

Die Schweiz von ihrer besten Seite

5. Tag – 88km nach Flüelen: Die ganze Nacht Regen, am Morgen Sonnenschein, was will man mehr. Da wir heute den Klausenpass überqueren wollten, packten wir alles nass ein und fuhren kurz nach 8 Uhr los. 34km ging es erst Mal auf Radwegen durch ein immer enger werdendes Tal aufwärts. Ein Paar Schäfchenwolken hingen zwischen den Bergen, der Tag war perfekt für einen langen Anstieg. Die Luft war klar und frisch, alles was wir hörten waren Kuhglocken, Motorradfahrer in der Ferne und ab und zu einen bellenden Hund. Als es dann ans richtige Bergauffahren ging, mussten wir auf die Hauptstraße wechseln. Der Verkehr war aber erträglich bis auf ein Paar Motorradfahrer, die es lustig fanden uns mit 100km/h und nur wenigen Zentimetern Abstand zu überholen. Nach ungefähr zwei Stunden und 13km erreichten wir ein Plateau, eine willkommene Ruhepause für unsere Beine auf mehr als 1,000m Seehöhe. Die letzten 8km waren dann supersteil und ich konnte kaum schneller als 5 km/h fahren. An manchen Stellen war die Strecke etwas furchteinflößend, zur Rechten ging es Hunderte von Metern steil nach unten. Nur ein sehr niedriges Geländer trennten Rudi, das Rad, vom Abgrund. Je höher wir kamen, desto schlechter wurde das Wetter und als wir endlich glücklich auf 1.952m Höhe angekommen waren, standen wir komplett in den Wolken. Jetzt freuten wir uns auf eine lange Abfahrt, die sich als Ente erwies, da wir noch zweimal bergauf fahren mussten. Als wir dann endlich ankamen, gönnten wir uns einen riesigen Döner, stellten unser Zelt am Vierwaldstätter See auf und gingen erschöpft ins Bett.

The beginning of the valley

Am Anfang des Tales

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Here is where the real pain began

Kurz vor dem richtigen Anstieg

The plateau

Das Plateau

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Still way to go...

Noch immer nicht oben…

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Hooray, we made it!

Hurra, geschafft!

Cold downhill

Kalte Abfahrt

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The Vierwaldstätter See

Der Vierwaldstätter See

6. – 53km nach Giswil: Obwohl das Wetter schön war, gingen wir den Tag langsam an, der Pass war noch deutlich in unseren Beinen zu spüren. Wir fuhren zunächst für ca. 10km auf einem Radweg am See entlang. Hier gab es sogar Radtunnels, die einzigen Tunnels, die wir mögen, bis wir ein Schild erreichten, das uns vor den folgenden Kilometern warnte, da der Radweg nun aufhörte. Da sehr viel Verkehr war nahmen wir den Zug ins nächste Dorf und radelten dann weiter zur Fähre über den See. Leider kamen wir 10 Minuten zu spät an und durften eineinhalb Stunden auf die nächste Fähre warten. Das Wetter war perfekt und wir genossen eine ausgedehnte Mittagspause. Als wir endlich auf der anderen Seite des Sees ankamen, wurde das Wetter wieder schlechter und bald radelten wir wieder im Regen. Innerhalb kürzester Zeit schüttete es wie aus Kübeln und auf dem Campingplatz entschieden wir uns für ein kleines Zimmer anstelle zu zelten. Das war allerdings eine schlechte Entscheidung, da es kurz darauf aufhörte zu regnen und es die ganze Nacht trocken blieb. Grrrrrrr!

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Waiting for the ferry

Wir warten auf die Fähre

Another picturesque village

Ein weiteres schönes Dorf

7. Tag – 82km nach Gwatt: Super schlecht geschlafen, unsere Nachbarin war von Albträumen geplagt und schrie mitten in der Nacht. Landschaftlich war die heutige Route sehr reizvoll, allerdings mussten wir sehr viele sehr steile Berge überwinden. Es begann mit einem 12%-Berg für ganze 2km und ging weiter mit vielen einfacheren Steigungen. Dann kam der Brünigpass, der leider viel zu stark befahren war, es fuhren Bus an Bus an Auto an uns vorbei, einfach nur gruselig. Wir waren froh, als wir endlich oben waren und entschieden uns für einen Umweg, um den Verkehr zu umgehen. Was wir nicht wirklich verstanden, war, dass der nationale Radweg über diesen Pass führt, wir fanden ihn viel zu gefährlich, da es weder Randstreifen noch ausreichend Platz für Radler und die vielen Autos, LKWs und Busse gab.

Heute passierten wir viele Hotels die ‘Free accommodation’ anboten. Sie meinten natürlich ‘Zimmer frei’, haben aber ‘Kostenlose Zimmer’ angeboten. Wir widerstanden der Versuchung, das Angebot anzunehmen, da wir doch lieber zelteten. Die Schweizer haben auch für uns Deutsche sehr lustig klingende Namen: Da gibt es die Fußpflege Zwicky, Märchy, Stöckli Metall AG, Garage Wursteisen, Tschudi Holz AG, um nur einige zu nennen. Eigentlich ist Schweizerdeutsch garnicht so schwer, man muss einfach ein ‘li’ an die Hauptwörter hängen und schon spricht man Schwizerdütsch. Na ja, ein Paar mehr Unterschiede gibt es schon, ich finde jedenfalls, dass die Sprache sehr schön klingt.

Auf unserer Route kamen wir auch durch Interlaken, das zwischen zwei Seen liegt und einen fantastischen Blick auf die Jungfrau bietet. Leider ist das weithin bekannt und die Stadt war voll mit Touristen aus der ganzen Welt, vor allem aus dem Nahen Osten und Asien. Daher radelten wir ein bisschen schneller durch die wunderschöne Stadt und bewunderten die Jungfrau in Wolken. Wir zelteten auf dem bisher teuersten und leider auch sehr schäbigen Campingplatz und als es Bettzeit war zog ein schweres Gewitter auf und Sturm und Regen tobten die ganze Nacht. Jetzt war es Zeit zu entscheiden, was wir bei diesem Regenwetter machen sollten!

Another sunny morning

Sonne am Morgen

Steep hills

Steile Berge

Beautiful scenery

Bezaubernde Landschaften

Wooden houses with yummy tomatoes

Holzhäuser und leckere Tomaten

More picturesque villages

Noch bezauberndere Dörfer

Glaciers

Gletscher

Fantastic downhills

Unglaubliche Abfahrten

Tourists

Touristen

Vomiting cyclists

Warnung vor kotzenden Radlern

Dangerous rail tracks

Warnung vor gefährlichen Gleisen

Another lake

Und noch ein See

Another lovely village

Und noch ein Dorf

And another overpriced campsite

Und noch ein überteuerter Campingplatz

1,000 kilometers

Since our last update we’ve made quite some progress. We are in Ljubljana now, the capital of Slovenia. So far we haven’t seen much since the campsite is outside the city and we only arrived yesterday in the late afternoon. Slovenia will be part of my next blog post.

In the meantime we visited Venice in the rain – a good excuse to choose a hotel again – and as my brother said: water from above and from underneath. The city is amazing, with all its canals, singing gondoliers and beautiful historic buildings.

 

The following day the weather was beautiful again and we continued pedaling East along the Adriatic coast and we thought we were back in the Dutch polders: small canals, green fields, fishermen….

 

But when we arrived we knew we were still in Italy, occupied by German and Dutch vacationers: Caorle is a huge vacation resort with parks of vacation apartments and huge 5 star campsites. Most of the campsites were already closed so we decided to ask at the tourist information where to go. They sent us 8km back again from where we came and we arrived at a HUGE resort with a golf course and all kinds of animation and bracelets you have to wear so everyone knows you belong there (all you need after a long day cycling and all we appreciate so much – for those who don’t know us so well, we are the mini-campers preferably at a farm with clean and quiet facilities). But given there was no other choice we decided to ask for a spot, when they told us we had to stay two nights. TWO NIGHTS. Charming Johan tried to convince the two women behind the reception and told them we are cycling to Turkey and we cannot afford paying two nights etc., etc. But no success, the women looked at us as if we were completely nuts, since rules are rules and even if we are in Italy rules cannot be broken. And this while we are there clearly after the high season. So the Swabian and the Dutch decided to leave this place and continued looking for a campsite. And annoying things are always good for something: not even 500m later we found another beautiful campsite and we only paid 10 EUR for the night! And we could still hear the DJ all night long from the other resort – for free :-))).

The next day we wanted to reach Slovenia, finally a new country on our list. Shortly after our departure we reached our first 1,000 km:

We could have made it to Slovenia, if we would not have gone in circles for the last 3 hours or so. Believe it or not, but we just couldn’t find the right way other than taking the extremely busy national roads. They usually don’t have bike-paths and no shoulders at all. The traffic that day was so horrendous that we both did not want to take these roads. The problem though was that the villages on our maps did not match with the few villages on the road signs (if there were signs at all!). We just couldn’t find any decent road to cycle on. We ended up using our small handlebar compasses, cycling non-paved roads, which is not really an issue, until the street decides to suddenly turn West while we actually have to go East. So here you see our problem. We were so desperate in the end to make at least some progress that we decided at around 6.30pm (close to sunset) to take the national road – following the only sign to a city we also found on our map. Thankfully it wasn’t as busy anymore, however, still no fun to cycle. And the good end of this story: We ended up in a great ‘agriturismo’ with a nice room, warm showers, great food and wine and a cosy bed to sleep in. Life is beautiful!

Race against time

September 18, 2012 – Today we rise early because we know  we have a long ride ahead of us: we want to reach Chioggia at the Adriatic Sea. It still takes us about two hours to get ready every morning and we finally sit on our bikes by 9am and leave beautiful Verona. We have a slow start along the river Adige through a natural reserve, or a jungle? Am I day-dreaming or are we already in India? Within 30 minutes I have about 20 mosquito bites and we decide to buy Autan, since Deet might be too aggressive for use in Europe.

By lunch time we cycled a bit more than 40km, which is not much given that we cycle through a very flat area. The weather is great, 26 degrees Celsius, little clouds, no wind. Today’s route is quite boring so far, long straight roads with little distractions alongside other than corn fields, apple trees (again) and industry.

Two hours later and approximately 35km farther we have another break with Italian espresso and pastries, knowing we still have a few kilometers to cycle. Johan estimates we have to cycle another 40km.

The landscape becomes much nicer again, with small vegetable gardens and nicer villages along the road. Most of the time we cycle on smaller roads, bike  paths now become a luxury and we really need to concentrate on the traffic since there are a lot of speeding vans and trucks on the roads. This is when I finally start appreciating my small mirror (which is actually as embarrassing as white socks in sandals), because I see big trucks or speeding cars well ahead and won’t get caught by surprise.

As of kilometer 70 the first pain kicks in: it is no longer the legs, this time it is my neck. But I am not complaining just concentrating on the route and pedal, pedal, pedal….. At around 6pm and approximately 110km cycled, we take another break and decide what to do. By now we should have reached the coast, but looking at the map we don’t seem to make any progress. It is now that we realize that we calculated the distance with the wrong scale (there are two different scales on our map) and 1cm isn’t 2km but 4km! Great. Two handful of nuts and raisins and some more apple juice later we decide to continue as long as we can and hopefully still reach the coast. By now there is more pain: the bottom and the hands, but we’ll survive.

At kilometer 120 my saddle starts making funny noises – it is clear that not only I but also my bike wants to stop cycling, the earlier the better. I see an ‘agriturismo’, but we just continue. At 7pm we have to rearrange the luggage on the back so cars can see our backlights, it is getting dark early now. In the meantime we get some headwinds and I am cycling for a few kilometers in Johan’s slipstream until he gets too fast again for me. And we cycle and cycle and cycle until we finally see a sign to Chioggia telling us another 6km until we are there. Not a big relief for me, since by now also my legs don’t want to continue anymore.  But I am strong I keep telling myself and just continue. Finally reaching the outskirts of Chioggia we realize that we cannot find a way into the city other than the motorway, so we turn again to find some hidden paths and another 20min later we are there. The city is very disappointing, totally run down, if you can say that from a city and I am glad I am not cycling alone.

By about 8.30pm we find a camping – a huge and horrible place with extremely weird people  – where we can put up our tent, eat, shower and sleep. Another 20 mosquito bites later I lay on my mattress in my sleeping bag and listen all night to frogs jumping on our tent (Johan doesn’t believe this, but it is true, we both saw them walking through the sand before we went to bed and I could hear them because I was too exhausted to sleep).

In total we cycled 142km in more than 7 hours. My new record – we still have to beat Johan’s record of 160km.